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    Published on: June 24, 2010

    ...sponsored by TCC, “changing shopper behavior”

    Notes & comment...

    If “sustainability” was the keyword yesterday, “connectivity” was front and center this morning, with a focus on how technology has created a new marketing environment that needs to be embraced by both retailers and manufacturers. Some highlights:

    Andy Bond, the chairman of Walmart-owned Asda Stores, said that he is passionate about the notion that consumers need to be participants in the businesses that they patronize, that we are entering an era in which “our businesses are run by the consumer for the consumer.” Consumers, he said, are exercising a kind of “collective power” via the internet that might also be called “democratic consumerism,” on a scale never before seen.

    Asda, he said, has accepted this reality - in part because it has no choice. After all, he said, there are 200 Asda-related Facebook pages, but only one of them controlled by the company. And so the company has created an online infrastructure that allows shoppers to review products, and the result has been 90,000 product reviews in the past year, read by 25 percent of Asda’s customers. It also has meant creating webcams that allow visitors to Asda’s site - YourAsda - to actually watch goings on at headquarters, in stores, even at suppliers’ factories.

    “This is not about losing control of your business,” Bond said. “It is about understanding that you will run a better business if you let your customers in.”

    One of Asda’s more provocative ideas - a contest that will reward customers who come up with good ideas with real money. That means, he said, offering five percent of annual savings to whoever comes up with a money-saving idea. Save the company two million pounds, he said, and you can get a check for five percent of those savings.

    Zein Abdalla, CEO of PepsiCo Europe, made the same point about welcoming consumers in, pointing out that an internet-based campaign to get shoppers to come up with a new flavor for its Walker’s chips line in the UK led to more than one million entries and four million site visitors.

    “Digital is a solution,” he said, a kind of “connecting glue” that is “a way to enter into dialogue with target consumers.” Of course, this also creates business process challenges, he said - because once you’ve invited consumers in, you have to respond quickly. In the case of the new chip flavor, that meant bringing the winner to market in four weeks, rather than the 26 weeks that ordinarily would have been needed.”

    Along these same lines, Mike Bosman, CEO of One Digital Media in South Africa, said that consumers “don’t see things the way they are. They see things the way they are,” meaning that they filter all their experiences through they own filter of technology and experience, and then share their opinions with others who do the same thing, creating a kind of “super consumer” of enormous power. “Imagine if they like your product and brand,” he said. “And then imagine if they don’t like your product and brand.”

    Of course...sometimes things are not what they seem. The morning led off with students from the City of London Freeman School performing a scripted revue about the impact of technology on their habits and desires - though it seemed more like some adult’s perspective on what he or she thought that teenaged passions and priorities must be. (Sure, there were Lady Gaga referencers...but there also was music from Close Encounters of the Third Kind and Beverly Hills Cop which sort of threw the whole exercise into question.)

    But then, at the end of the morning, when three of the performers were brought up on stage to talk about their own buying habits, it turned out that they are mostly concerned about peer pressure and price, and that in addition to Facebook and YouTube, television and magazines play an important role in shaping their buying decisions. Score one for traditional media! (Memo to moderator: always pre-interview your panelists...)

    There is, I think, lessons here that we all need to keep in mind.

    First of all, we need to remember that teenagers are not a homogeneous group. They have as many differences as similarities, and certainly are shaped by the specifics of their upbringings, surroundings, education, etc... Treat them as a blob, and the quality of your marketing efforts will be equally blob-like.

    Second, one of the reasons that internet marketing has taken off to the degree that it has is that adults - you know, the people with the actual money - have adopted it. Kids often don;t buy on the internet because they don’t have credit cards...but they show no compunction about asking their parents to make purchases for them. (This has the added advantage of making it more likely that the parent will pay for the actual acquisition.)

    Finally, to quote the writer William Goldman, “Nobody knows anything.” (He was talking about Hollywood, but the same could be said about all of us who talk and write about this stuff.)

    Figuring out where technology is going to take us is a highly predictive, subjective and even instinctive business. We know how Facebook and YouTube have grown, but where will they be in five years? What will be their next iterations? And how will these young people respond to all these various influences when they start making their own purchase decisions?

    The key, as Bond said, is a level of transparency that embraces the options, listens to the participants, and engages with users in a way that invites them into the retailing and marketing process. The winners, in the end, will be the companies that are facile and nimble enough to know that there are no concrete answers, that there is no finish line.

    Here’s the question I would like to have had asked of the hundreds of mostly middle aged white men who made up the CGF Summit audience. At one point, during a Q&A session, referring to the importance of engagement, Andy Bond said that he had Googled his name and found a high level of reaction to something he’d said in an article.

    So here’s the question I wish the moderator had asked. He should have turned to the audience and asked, “How many people here have Googled their own name? How many have Googled the name of your company?”

    I have no idea how many hands would have been thrust into the air. But the answer, either way, would have been instructive.

    My Web Grocer

    I’ll be filing an update from the CGF Summit here in London later this afternoon. Look for an email informing you that it has been posted.

    BTW...I’ve finally posted some retail pictures from the Australian leg of my trip on our MNB Facebook page.

    Thanks, as always, to TCC ... which is sponsoring “The Content Guy On The Road.”

    TCC offers customized retail marketing programs that change shopper behavior - attracting new customers and building customer loyalty...generating 4-5 percent sales increases and expanding basket sizes...generating in-store excitement and creating real and tangible differential advantages for your stores.

    For more information, Click here.
    KC's View:
    Quickly...I got an email this morning from MNB user Chris Anstey in which he responded to a point I made yesterday afternoon...and which I think deserves elaboration here.

    I wrote (and you can see the whole piece in the reposting of yesterday’s update at the bottom of the home page):

    There are only four US retailers here, and three of them - Walmart, A&P, and IGA - have international connections that explain their presence. Only one US retailer - Price Chopper, of upstate NY - has seen fit to send a delegate here (though there are other Americans from various manufacturers, trade associations colleges, etc... and then there’s me).

    It seems to me that for CGF to be a truly global organization, they’re going to have to do a better job of speaking to and attracting US retailers to conferences like this one. There’s nothing wrong with being a Europe-centric organization, or being both Europe-centric and Asia-centric. But you can’t be really global without the US at the table.


    To which Chris Anstey responded:

    Who needs who most? Does CGF have to woo the US retailer? Or should the US retailers be recognising that their responsibilities for collaboration stretch beyond the oceans? I’ll answer my own question for you! These companies should engage willingly.

    The CEO’s hold the keys to the solutions for food industry sustainability and it’s good to see the CGF leaders doing something about it. The followers and laggards, not only in the USA, may get the benefits anyway but need to consider whether they are delivering their own values for their staff and their consumers. They sit on their own operational efficiency drives without working on the sustainability of their raw materials or the consumption of their consumers.


    An excellent point. I accept the premise that too many American food retailers are provincial and don’t always see the value of traveling over the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. No argument here, and I should have included that in my criticism.

    That said...it must be noted that a lack of attendance at the CGF Summit is not necessarily exactly the same thing as being unwilling to travel around the world to see new things. One can do the latter with doing the former.

    But I’ll stick with my original statement, that if CGF wants to be truly global, it has to figure out a way to get them to “stretch beyond the oceans.”

    Published on: June 24, 2010

    Forbes reports that The United Nations Global Compact (UNGC) and Accenture have released the results of a study entitled "A New Era of Sustainability: CEO reflections on progress to date, challenges ahead and the impact of the journey toward a sustainable economy," which, despite a somewhat wordy title, offers a look at the view of sustainability from the top of more than 750 organizations.

    One of the key learnings from the survey - that the global recession had, in fact, allowed numerous companies to use economic rationales to address sustainability issues, addressing not just environmental concerns but also “core business value like cost reduction and revenue growth.”

    In fact, only 12 percent of the businesses surveyed had reduced their investment inn sustainability initiatives because of the economic downturn, while 74 percent said they had aligned sustainability concerns more closely with core business strategies.

    The report went on, “The widespread perception of the increased importance of sustainability may reflect a new appreciation of the scale and complexity of global challenges facing business today. As issues of climate change and the natural environment, social development and global corporate governance become ever more pressing, CEOs are acutely conscious of the challenges ahead. These challenges have a direct impact on companies’ operations, but also demonstrate the role business must play in addressing the demands of the new century. As one emerging market CEO told us, ‘Sustainable development will be a basic guarantee for our company’s survival and growth’.”

    Forbes notes that “the report concludes that while CEOs see a final destination for connecting sustainability and their businesses, the methods and timeline to get there remain uncertain. Some of the proposed action points include:

    • Generating new knowledge, skills and mindsets to drive sustainable development.
    • Corporate training in sustainability.
    • Attracting and engaging employees.
    • Leading to an investment environment more favorable to sustainable businesses.
    • Embedding new concepts of value and performance at the organizational and individual levels.

    “Not surprisingly, this puts the onus on companies to develop talented human capital that is vigilant, aware and cognizant of pursuing a successful career at a company that aligns with their values and commitments. This has already begun to emerge as the greatest challenge for corporate America. Or an advantage, if you choose to recognize it as one.”
    KC's View:
    Couldn’t have said it better myself. In fact, this story dovetails perfectly with many of the concerns addressed yesterday here in London at the Consumer Goods Forum (CGF) Summit.

    Sustainability isn’t just for tree-huggers and liberals anymore. It is increasingly recognized as a core business value with enormous strategic value for companies that themselves wish to have sustainable success.

    Published on: June 24, 2010

    • The Chicago Sun Times reports that Chicago Mayor Richard Daley apparently has convinced Walmart officials to create a pay scale for their proposed “dozens” of Windy City stores that would beginning employees paid $8.75 per hour, and then “best employees” - those with good attendance and work habits - increased up to $9.50 per hour after a year.

    Walmart officials, however, are not confirming the deal.
    KC's View:
    I wonder how Walmart will structure its management of the Chicago stores. With dozens of stores, large and small, planned for the city, it is almost like a mini chain by itself. It might make sense to have one person running that min chain, creating both tangible and intangible benefits for ownership.

    My own nominee for such a job would be Shelley Broader, formerly of Sweetbay, who is running the company’s Sam’s Club division in Texas. But then again, I’d nominate Shelley to run practically anything, any time.

    Published on: June 24, 2010

    Wisconsin-based Skogen’s Festival Foods has announced a partnership with the Green Bay Packers to operate two eateries, the Titletown Grill and Boomerang Café, in the Lambeau Field Atrium. The restaurants will be open in time for training camp and will be open on game weekends and for special events.
     
    According to Mark Skogen, CEO and President of Skogen’s Festival Foods, the operation of the eateries is a natural extension for the company, which recently opened The Marq (formerly the Apple Creek Inn) to expand its catering division and event business. “The Green Bay Packers are the epitome of excellence both on the field and in the community, and we are very proud and excited that they have chosen us as partners to operate the Festival Foods Titletown Grill and Festival Foods Boomerang Cafe,” said Skogen.

    The Titletown Grill and The Boomerang Café will replace Chili John’s and the Brett Favre Two-Minute Grill, whose operating contracts had expired.
    KC's View:
    I wonder how much actual business the Brett Favre Two-Minute Grill actually did during the last two seasons, considering that Favre was playing for other teams.

    One of the things I like about this is the fact that it suggests that Skogen’s is making a real investment in quality foods - both with the stadium locations (and stadiums are offering better food these days) and the catering business.

    Lunds/Byerly’s is doing the same thing at the new Target Field, where its wild rice soup is being sold. It is great in terms of extending the brand, and it says much about priorities.

    Published on: June 24, 2010

    The Richmond Times Dispatch reports that Whole Foods has taken over an acre of land “in the West Broad Village development for a community garden that will help supply its local store ... The garden is part of an increasing effort by retailers and others to bring locally grown products to grocery stores and restaurants. Items grown in the garden initially will be used as ingredients for prepared foods and in the store's salad bar,” and eventually, will be sold directly to shoppers in the produce department.

    According to the story, “This is the Austin, Texas-based grocer's first on-site field-to-store garden.” The paper also notes that the garden, which is just several hundred yards from the store’s front door, could be expanded to as large as six acres if the test catches on and is shown to be appealing to local shoppers.
    KC's View:
    This is similar to what Wegmans seems to be doing on a somewhat larger scale in upstate New York, and it is very smart. There’s nothing wrong with creating stronger connections between people and the sources of their food, and it is very much in line with Whole Foods’ broader brand message.

    Published on: June 24, 2010

    The Seattle Times reports that Metropolitan Markets there is “the first in the nation to introduce a completely compostable tray for fish, poultry and other meats. The trays are made from 100 percent corn and take only two months to decompose.”

    Brad Halverson, vice president of marketing, tells the paper that “the market will encourage its customers to ‘drop the trays into their yard-waste or food bins’ rather than into the trash or recycling. That way, the trays can be sent to Cedar Grove Composting and, within three or four months, the resulting compost soil can be resold to local residents for their gardens ... The introduction of the compostable trays is in response to a new city ordinance that requires all single-use food-service packaging to be compostable or recyclable. The ordinance takes effect July 1.”
    KC's View:
    I know there are some people out there - indeed, there are a lot of people out there - who would argue that this ordinance is yet another example of government out of control, that the markets should determine whether companies like Metropolitan Markets make such moves.

    On the other hand, I have a hard time seeing how this is a bad thing. It strikes me that at the end of the day, the environment in Seattle is better off for this ordinance...and there is no reason why a public policy approach to environmental issues cannot include such requirements.

    But it certainly is a legitimate debate on the role of public policy.

    Published on: June 24, 2010

    The Chattanoogan reports that “Bi-Lo has launched a new health and wellness initiative called Bi-Lo thrive!, which includes a full-time registered dietitian on staff to educate shoppers about healthy living alternatives.

    According to the story, “Monica Amburn, RD, LD, will provide customers with free health and wellness tips, while showing shoppers that buying healthier foods can be affordable and easy to find in Bi-Lo stores. Ms. Amburn will spearhead Bi-Lo’s efforts to offer nutrition and wellness solutions and help shoppers and their families achieve a balanced way of life ... Bi-Lo thrive! will be supported by radio and circular advertisements, where program-specific items will be called out in detail by Ms. Amburn.”
    KC's View:

    Published on: June 24, 2010

    In the UK, the Telegraph reports that “The Il Vinaio restaurant near Phoenix, Arizona, is offering a ‘lion burger’ for $21 (£14), served with spicy homemade crisps and roast corn on the cob.

    “The restaurant has already received a bomb threat and hundreds of angry emails from animal rights activists. Owner Cameron Selogie said the decision to serve the lion burgers was a tribute to South Africa, host nation of the World Cup.” The restaurant owner says that he is telling protesters that while lion is on the protected list, it is not on the endangered list. The lions are farm-raised in Illinois.
    KC's View:
    I’m guessing that the whole “protected but not endangered” and “farm-raised” arguments are not real persuasive to the protesters, much less to the lions.

    Could have been worse.

    They could be calling it the “Mufasa Burger,” or the “Simba Burger,” served with a good Circle of Life wine and, maybe, fava beans. Wonder if when they run out of lions they’ll start serving komodo dragon burgers.

    I’m just being honest here. While there is a part of me that finds this a little distasteful, if I’m sitting in that restaurant, and lion burgers are on the menu, I’m thinking about ordering one.

    What the hell. I was eating kangaroo a week ago.

    Published on: June 24, 2010

    The Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal reports that Target Corp. is partnering with Ben & Jerry’s to sell two flavors - Berry Voluntary and Brownie Chew Gooder - “created to encourage customers to volunteer in their local communities through a promotion called “Scoop it Forward.” An affiliate website helps shoppers find volunteer opportunities in their neighborhoods.

    “After registering for a volunteer activity — and forwarding the volunteer program to five friends — that person and each of his or her friends will receive a coupon for a free pint of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, redeemable at Target stores, while supplies last.”
    KC's View:

    Published on: June 24, 2010

    • The Ottawa Citizen reports that negotiations have broken down between Loblaws and the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) over a new contract covering almost 30,000 employees for the chain. Strike votes are expected be taken during coming weeks, ands the union says that there is “no economic case” for the concessions being demanded by Loblaws.

    • The San Diego Union-Tribune reports that the City Council there is considering a proposal that would require big box stores looking to open within the city limits to provide economic impact statements. The proposal has been turned over to the city attorney’s office, which will render an opinion on the legality of the proposed ordinance.

    According to the paper, “The proposal is viewed by critics as an attempt to thwart efforts by Walmart to build in the city, and the company has been running full-page advertisements in the San Diego Union-Tribune to combat it.”

    • Crest Foods reportedly is getting ready to open its newest Fresh Market store, in south Oklahoma City, a 95,000 square foot unit with several features new to the company - a sushi bar, drive-through pharmacy, and wellness clinic.

    According to The Oklahoman, the new features will not change the company’s “rock bottom prices” approach to grocery that is in its six other stores.

    • Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal has launched an investigation into whether the possibility that CVS Caremark could end its CVS Health Savings Pass in the state could violate state law by depriving residents of discounts. The threat by CVS came as the state demanded access for medicaid patients.

    CVS has responded by saying that the program is a voluntary one, not required by any state law.

    Bloomberg Business Week reports that Procter & Gamble “has ended testing of a lower-cost ‘basic’ version of Tide laundry detergent but hasn't decided what's next.” Tide Basic, introduced at a time when the recession seemed to be turning some consumers in the direction of private brands, “cost 20 percent less than regular Tide but lacked the latest cleaning technologies.”

    Earlier this week, the Cincinnati Enquirer reported that “Tide detergent, Procter & Gamble's signature brand, will undergo a change in formula later this summer ... Called Tide ActiLift, the new variety will include three new ingredients and is formulated to better remove stains and also prevent them.”

    • The National Retail Federation (NRF) is out with a new study saying that “nearly 144 million Americans or 61.9 percent of adults over 18 years old will celebrate the holiday the traditional way by attending or hosting a cookout/barbecue or picnic, which is the about the same as last year (62.6%).

    • Published reports say that quick service chain Friendly’s has a new item almost certain to make nutritionists’ heads explode - an Ultimate Grilled Cheeseburger, that has a cheeseburger wedged between two grilled cheese sandwiches, and consists of 1,500 calories, 97 grams of fat and more than 2,000 milligrams of sodium.
    KC's View:

    Published on: June 24, 2010

    • Weis Markets today announced Janice Brown - formerly of Price Chopper, Wegmans and Giant of Carlisle - has joined the Company as District Manager for 13 stores in Western Maryland and West Virginia.
    KC's View:

    Published on: June 24, 2010

    ...will return.
    KC's View:

    Published on: June 24, 2010

    ...sponsored by TCC, “changing shopper behavior”

    Notes & comment...reposted from yesterday afternoon’s update...

    LONDON - The subject was sustainability, and the afternoon’s marquee speaker was the Prince of Wales, who has had a long interest in sustainable agriculture, even to the point that he has cerated his own line of food products - Duchy Originals - reflecting his priorities.

    The speech by Prince Charles was not nearly as dry as this Colonist expected; he had a wry and self-deprecating sense of humor. (The Prince seemed amused that his competition in the time slot was the World Cup game between England and Slovenia, conceding that most of the Brits in the room were probably far more interested in what was going on in the football game ... which, as it happened, England won 1-0.) But the passion behind the Prince’s words was unmistakable.

    In his comments to the retailers and manufacturers attending the Summit, Prince Charles focused primarily on sustainable fishing, noting that there have been estimates that all commercial fisheries will collapse by 2050 unless the industry takes a more responsible approach to how they are nurtured. And, he said, the impact will be broader than just seafood availability, since the collapse of commercial fisheries also will affect villages and towns and people who depend on fishing for their livelihoods.

    The Prince urged the food industry to become a “formidable force for good,” suggesting that “the health and stability of the world economy depends on the health of the world’s ecosystems.” And, he said, these problems won;t go away “if companies just paint their products with a brighter shade of green.” To do otherwise, he said, “is not sustainable, and also is not moral ... I wonder why we are dogged by collective hubris” that makes people think that these problems need not be dealt with.

    The issue of sustainability - and climate change - was also at the center of a joint presentation given by Sir Terry Leahy, CEO of Tesco, and Paul Polman, CEO of Unilever, in which they pledged to help guide CGF toward a strategic and cooperative approach to these issues that affects production, packaging, and even the end use by the consumer. This is good business, Leahy noted, saying that shoppers are concerned about climate change and want to patronize companies with a responsible approach to the issue. Polman agreed, saying that “to say their is a choice between growth and cutting carbon emissions is just wrong,” and he emphasized that his goal is to double the size of Unilever’s business while still cutting total carbon emissions.

    In another presentation, Joanne Denney-Finch, chief executive, IGD, made the same point: “Over a trillion dollars of food is traded between countries each year. We draw on a big share of the world’s resources, including 70% of fresh water. We shape the landscape, and diet has a big influence on human health and vitality. So we’re the world’s most important industry and society is asking more and more of us. We need new and sustainable strategies for growth.”

    Essentially, all of these executives were making precisely the same point, albeit from different directions - that while there may be some barriers to making a more sustainable approach to business a reality (such as price, education of the consumers, and even a sense of hopelessness that citizens actually can have an impact), food retailers and manufacturers have both an ethical and economic mandate for change...and to ignore it is to run the risk of irrelevance in the eyes of the consumer population.

    Other random thoughts ...

    • Not sure if anyone else noticed, but I thought it was interesting that in an afternoon of speeches focused on things like sustainability, energy savings and seafood, the name ‘BP” was not mentioned. Not even once.

    • Gareth Ackerman, chairman of South Africa’s Pick n Pay Stores, noted that one of the challenges facing the food industry is the high rate of consolidation, and he pointed out how much of American supermarket sales are generated by the top five retailers there. What he didn’t point out was that only one of those top five - Walmart - is in attendance here.

    In fact, there are only four US retailers here, and three of them - Walmart, A&P, and IGA - have international connections that explain their presence. Only one US retailer - Price Chopper, of upstate NY - has seen fit to send a delegate here (though there are other Americans from various manufacturers, trade associations colleges, etc... and then there’s me).

    It seems to me that for CGF to be a truly global organization, they’re going to have to do a better job of speaking to and attracting US retailers to conferences like this one. There’s nothing wrong with being a Europe-centric organization, or being both Europe-centric and Asia-centric. But you can’t be really global without the US at the table.

    My Web Grocer

    BTW...I’ve finally posted some retail pictures from the Australian leg of my trip on our MNB Facebook page.

    Thanks, as always, to TCC ... which is sponsoring “The Content Guy On The Road.”

    TCC offers customized retail marketing programs that change shopper behavior - attracting new customers and building customer loyalty...generating 4-5 percent sales increases and expanding basket sizes...generating in-store excitement and creating real and tangible differential advantages for your stores.

    For more information, Click here.
    KC's View:

    Published on: June 24, 2010

    ...will return.
    KC's View:

    Published on: June 24, 2010

    ...sponsored by TCC, “changing shopper behavior”

    Notes & comment...

    LONDON - We’re back to sustainability this afternoon in a series of presentations...

    • Paul Bulcke, CEO of Nestle, spoke about his conviction that consumers are going to demand that the companies with which they do business behave in socially responsible ways, and said that Nestle has focused on three areas - nutrition, water and rural development - in which it believes it can have a significant and relevant impact.

    In the case of nutrition, Bulcke said, Nestle is address nutritional deficiencies in the developing world with better products and by enhancing knowledge and awareness; water shortages are being dealt with through reduced usage; and, as an agricultural company, Nestle is working to be responsible about rural development.

    Important point: Creating additional value through socially responsible behavior, Bulcke said, does not mean creating additional cost.

    • Simon Crutchley, CEO of AVI Ltd. in South Africa, addressed the consequences of overfishing, explaining that the loss of wild fish could be “the most damaging activity on our planet. He explained that industry had to find an alternative to the 13 million tons of wild fish caught and ground up to be fed to cattle, chickens and even other fish - a practice that he said was tantamount to eviscerating natural resources for short-term returns.

    Crutchley urged retailers to only deal with companies that are certified as having engaged only in environmentally viable fishing practices. And, he said, “sustainable wild fisheries need sustainable economics,” which today they do not.

    While this is a problem, answers seemed to be in short supply.

    • Douglas M. Baker Jr., chairman/president/CEO of Ecolab, gave an overview of current food safety issues, and made one comment that surprised me - saying that while raw milk accounts for just one percent of the milk consumed in America, it actually causes 70 percent of the dairy-related food safety problems in the US. What this suggests, he said, is the trade-off that sometimes needs to be made when one decides to be resolute about organics or so-called purer foods.

    And, he added, “Humans are lousy risk managers, but...the most dangerous ones are the one that don’t realize that they are lousy at it.”

    • And finally, Tony Juniper, an environmental activist in the UK, quite frankly explained why - at least environmentally speaking - the world is going to hell in a hand basket because of global warming, pollution, non-sustainable fishing and a variety of other factors guaranteed to make your hair hurt. (Juniper gets points for being the person at the conference to say “BP.”)

    However, he said that companies willing to “reverse the historical relationship” between economic growth and environmental exploitation, and that are willing to work towards a zero carbon economy by the end of the century, have before them “one of the biggest business opportunities” in memory - if they are willing to take advantage of it.

    And with that, everybody went off to a reception sponsored by Suntory to drink Japanese scotch.


    My Web Grocer

    More tomorrow...

    Thanks, as always, to TCC ... which is sponsoring “The Content Guy On The Road.”

    TCC offers customized retail marketing programs that change shopper behavior - attracting new customers and building customer loyalty...generating 4-5 percent sales increases and expanding basket sizes...generating in-store excitement and creating real and tangible differential advantages for your stores.

    For more information, Click here.
    KC's View: