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HealthDay News reports on a new study out of the University of Chicago saying that, with some exceptions, American kids are seeing fewer TV commercials for candy and beverages while seeing more ads for fast food.

According to the story, “Between 2003 and 2007, daily exposure to food commercials decreased by 13.7 percent among children ages 2 to 5 and 3.7 percent among children ages 6 to 11, but increased by 3.7 percent for youngsters ages 12 to 17 ... Exposure to ads for sweets decreased 41 percent for children ages 2 to 5, 29.3 percent for those ages 6 to 11 and 12.1 percent for those ages 12 to 17. Exposure to ads for beverages decreased 27 percent to 30 percent across all age groups, including a sharp drop in ads for previously heavily advertised sugar-sweetened beverages.”

At the same time, “exposure to fast food ads increased 4.7 percent for children ages 2 to 5, 12.2 percent for those ages 6 to 11, and 20.4 percent for those ages 12 to 17, according to a news release from the publisher.”

However, the study also found that “in 2007, black children saw 1.4 to 1.6 times more food ads per day than white children, and their rate of exposure to fast food ads was more than double that of their white peers.”
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