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Fast Company has a piece by athlete/firefighter/author Robyn Benincasa, in which she looks at six different leadership styles and when to use them.

"Not only do the greatest teammates allow different leaders to consistently emerge based on their strengths," she writes, "but also they realize that leadership can and should be situational, depending on the needs of the team. Sometimes a teammate needs a warm hug. Sometimes the team needs a visionary, a new style of coaching, someone to lead the way or even, on occasion, a kick in the bike shorts. For that reason, great leaders choose their leadership style like a golfer chooses his or her club, with a calculated analysis of the matter at hand, the end goal and the best tool for the job."

Some excerpts from her analysis, based on research done by Daniel Goleman for the Harvard Business Review:

• "The pacesetting leader expects and models excellence and self-direction. If this style were summed up in one phrase, it would be 'Do as I do, now'."

• "The authoritative leader mobilizes the team toward a common vision and focuses on end goals, leaving the means up to each individual. If this style were summed up in one phrase, it would be 'Come with me'."

• "The affiliative leader works to create emotional bonds that bring a feeling of bonding and belonging to the organization. If this style were summed up in one phrase, it would be 'People come first'."

• "The coaching leader develops people for the future. If this style were summed up in one phrase, it would be 'Try this'."

• "The coercive leader demands immediate compliance. If this style were summed up in one phrase, it would be 'Do what I tell you'."

• "The democratic leader builds consensus through participation. If this style were summed up in one phrase, it would be 'What do you think?'"

You can read the whole piece here.
KC's View:

Interesting piece ... but she forgot the dictatorial leader, who has a style that would be summed up as "if you don't do what I want you to do right now, I'll eviscerate you, kill you, eat your spleen and then fire you." Or the conniving leader, who shuts down the company in which you have an ownership position, and then restarts it as a new venture in which he doesn't have to share ownership with anyone. Or the Jeffrey Katzenberg model (he is the former Paramount and Disney studio chief who now runs Dreamworks Animation); he famously used to tell his minions, "If you don't come in on Saturday, don't bother coming in on Sunday."